Tag Archives: facebook

It’s Not You, It’s Me

I did’t plan on breaking up with Facebook. I knew I was going to limit my time on the site because I was spending WAY too much of it there. But then I started reading The Gifts of Imperfection by Brenè Brown (OMG, soooooooo good! Go watch her TED Talks!), and I read her words about–paraphrasing here–spending time in fulfilling activity and how vegging in front of the computer for hours after work often leaves people feeling empty. I realized that’s exactly what I was doing. Vegging. For hours. Worse, I was “connected” with people from school, but because of that “connection” I’d quit actually seeking them out. Facebook was an addiction. And it was taking away from who I am instead of making me a stronger, wiser, happier person.

I don’t think that’s the same for everyone. But for me, Facebook without boundaries is worse than Pinterest.

So, I’m on a Facebook hiatus. When (if) I get back on, I’m setting a strict time limit.

Family, I love you! Text me. Email me. Tweet me. Or better yet, come see me! 

Friends, the same thing applies.

Facebook friends: We’ll meet again. I just need to Facebook detox. I’ll be back after Easter.

Hey Moms, Don’t Trust The Squeaky Clean Facebook Wall AKA Cashing in My Cool Card

Interesting conversations about social media at school this week. Several of the students said they no longer get on their Facebook pages. WEIRD, right?!?! I can’t imagine life without Grumpy Cat!

They said it’s because their moms are all on Facebook now. Ohhhhhhhhh.

Instead they spend their time on twitter and tumblr, places their mothers don’t understand. There was another place, too. Can’t believe I didn’t write it down. The conversation Wednesday in third period ended with one of the girls telling another not to “blast her business.” The class had to explain to me what that meant. They got a kick out of that.
So here’s my public service announcement for moms: if you’re not worried about your kids’ digital lives (learned that term this week too thanks to fellow teacher Scotty Coppage) because of their squeaky clean Facebook walls, don’t believe it for a minute. Their digital lives are WAY bigger than ours. But don’t freak out too much. They said their number one reason for leaving Facebook was all the drama. The next reason: all of us. They said twitter drama is even worse, but it’s different. I think some of them are using tumblr like their moms use Facebook.

These kids are digital natives. They embrace technology and toss it like two-year-old magazines on a regular basis. Most of us moms are digital newbies, even though we’ve been using social media almost as long as our kids if not longer. Some of us are just as addicted to social media as our kids if not more so. Social media can be awesome and wonderful. It can also be destructive, and not just for our kids. We owe it to them to be aware.

Yeah, I just cashed in my cool teacher card by “blasting their business.” I’m okay with that. 🙂

 

Countdown

I’ve loved this year at school, but this break has been amazing. I’ve slept in, cleaned closets, found photos that made me laugh (on my Facebook if you want to see). I’ve spent time with family, lost Phase 10, eaten too much low carb food and created a “lowish” carb almond butter mousse to die for that’s now reserved for holidays only (recipe at end of post). I’ve spent hours with Emmie on my lap, survived another blizzard, and I’ve shared a million and twelve funny memes on Facebook, the best of which remains Grumpy Cat Star Wars. I’ve written (not enough) and read and read and read. I caught up to the end of the GRR Martin Game of Thrones series (SOOOOOOOOO GOOD!!!!!!), I finished Peggy Browning’s Fifty Odd book (SOOOOOOOOO GOOD!!!!), read Ally Carter’s Uncommon Criminals (Sooooooooooo Good!!!!!!!) and started the latest Dresden, which so far is….Soooooo good!!!

See a theme? That’s been this break. Sooooo Good.

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Recipe for Deadly “Lowish Carb” Almond Mousse

1.5 cups heavy whipping cream, splenda (I used four packets), a little vanilla: Whip it up

In a separate bowl combine 1 box cream cheese, 1/4 C almond butter (or more), sugar free chocolate syrup..just a little–maybe 2 TBSP, half that amount of sugar free carmel syrup.

TASTE that mix and see if it’s yummy. If it needs a little more sweet, add some splenda, one packet at a time. It doesn’t need to be super sweet because it’s rich, rich, rich.

 

Once it’s perfect, fold in the whipping cream you’ve already whipped up.

Top with dollop of whipped cream and a tiny bit of sugar free chocolate syrup.

OMG soooooooo good and sooooooooo bad.

Emmie Afghan

Social Media Extravaganza

Or maybe just social media with a friend at Starbucks. Christian Young Adult and Romance author Janet Brown is learning about social media with me today. You can check out her website here. If you have any awesome suggestions, feel free to share. I’m a Mac, she’s a PC, this is going to be fun. 🙂

When the going gets tough…

I’ve fretted for over twenty-four hours on revisions and it hit me today that all the worrying is RIDICULOUS because I’m using it as an excuse NOT to work. I know it’s going to be hard work, and I’m avoiding it…like I avoid exercise and shaving my legs every day and vacuuming. Only I love this story, so I don’t know why I’m doing this to myself. I need to get the egg timer out and use it. And I need to turn OFF the wifi. The “You know you grew up in Burkburnett” facebook pages is taking up tons of time because I can’t stop reading it. 🙂 I’m going to use this nostalgia in a book one day.

What I’m working on: DGW, YA light paranormal. Main characters: Addy and Sharlene. Who knew all that time watching Mad Men would end up being HELPFUL to the books. This pic is VERY important to DGW.

So are the next two.

Time to stop procrastinating. Chapter 2, I’m done avoiding you.

Don’t forget Prodigal is on sale now. Click the link to buy or preview. Coupon Code: ZH29T good this week! Use it and the book’s only $0.99! Sisters with secrets.
Eighteen years ago, Cass Deason Myers ran away from home and heartbreak. Now she’s running away again, this time to the home she left behind. A preacher’s wife, Cass finds herself questioning her faith and her marriage. Her sister’s phone call asking for help with their mother provides the perfect opportunity to escape.
Anna Deason-Fite-Turner doesn’t want or need help for herself or her three daughters. But her mother is another story all together. Calling Cass is a last resort. But when Anna finds the bottle of pills in Momma’s dresser drawer, she knows she has to call her sister. Unfortunately, Anna knows when Cass comes home the whispers will start, and once again, everyone in town will compare perfect Cass to her failure of a sister, even though she’s the one who stayed behind.
Prodigal: a story about family, faith and the redemptive power of love.

 

You know you grew up in…

This last week facebook has exploded with “You know you grew up in….” groups. It’s been a fun walk down memory lane.

I’ll never forget the little store down the street from my house. We’d walk down barefoot to spend our allowance (Usually a quarter.)

I loved the feel of hot asphalt on my feet.

Once I found what I thought was four quarters in the road outside my house. I brought my friends with me to the store to buy us all candy. Turned out I had four Susan B. Anthony dollars! The store owner tried to convince me to save them. No way! We bought TONS of junk and shared it.

Back then we took off out the door as soon as possible on summer mornings and wouldn’t come home until dark. We’d play in the park, run around in the cow pastures, walk all over the place, but we made sure that when the sun went down we were home. If we weren’t TROUBLE followed.

Dark didn’t stop the fun, though. Dark brought ghost stories, and light as a feather, and Bloody Mary, and TV…sometimes.

I remember childhood in small town USA and I smile.

But one of the girls added to the group didn’t smile.

Her first post was “I didn’t really know you people and you made my life hell, why would I want to be in this group?”

The responses were fast: That was 20 years ago, get over it, and I’m sorry, and if you feel that way get off the group, and you’re right, and facebook allows people to apologize and give you peace over those times.

The girl did take herself off our hometown group, but I couldn’t help but think about how intense her emotions were 20 years later. She made sure people knew this wasn’t something she spent time thinking about, she’d moved on, was a success in life now, but that reminder of school years put her right back in that place she’d been when she lived in our town.

We talk about bullying today as if it’s something new. It’s not. Kids can be mean. They can be brutal. And adults have often turned away and let it happen.

I’m going to enjoy looking back on the memories of days gone by as I look at the facebook group, but I’m going to take a lesson from it, too. Our schools can be a place of fun and family, but they can also be a place that hurts. I want to make my class one where hurt is rare.

Sad Day

A couple weeks ago while we were at Publications Camp, a girl connected to several of the students killed herself.

It’s not the kind of phone call you want your kids to get. It’s a phone call that takes place all too often these days.

The girl, a kid in high school, was a victim of cyber-bullying, but she was also fighting depression.

So often teenagers are told their depression isn’t real, that they’ll “get over it,” but in the moment, that promise of being fine one day seems more of a fairy tale than truth.

Last year we did a story in the newspaper about how social networking has made bullying so much worse. Used to you might have trouble with a handful of kids. Now that handful can be hundreds. If the person being bullied has a smart phone, that’s non-stop harassment about their clothes or their hair or their sexual preference or their choice of music or who stole whose boyfriend and who’s a skank-ho. When I was a kid, you could walk away, today the bullying follows you everywhere you go.

I didn’t know the girl who took her life. She didn’t go to my school. But I’ve seen plenty of others like her, just getting by, trying to hold on to the idea that it will get better some day.

We’ll definitely be doing another cyber-bullying story this year. Until it stops, we’ve got to.