A Snow Day That Changed the World

…okay, that’s probably a bit of an overstatement, but all day #evaluatethat has been trending on twitter, and that fact has me feeling a bit on the positive side. #evaluatethat is dedicated to stories  from teachers, students and parents about positive educational moments that can’t be measured on a test. I probably would’ve never seen the hashtag if not for Diane Ravitch’s blog. If you believe in public education, and you aren’t following Ravitch, stop now and go follow her!

In the midst of all these great tweets I’ve seen a few legitimate questions from naysayers. People, almost always non-educators, ask how can we rid our schools of bad teachers without tests and merit pay?

I have a couple answers.

1. A test doesn’t rid your schools of bad teachers. It doesn’t rid your school of bad teachers because a test doesn’t magically create good teachers. An AWFUL teacher can have a classroom of kids pass a test. And an amazing beyond belief teacher can see half her students pass a test and half fail and know those results are miraculous. The awful teacher with a classroom full of kids passing the test will go about the business of life without a care in the world but with a huge carbon footprint courtesy of his school’s copy machine, a curriculum provided complete with scripts and five bajillion practice tests. The great teacher will go home exhausted and horrified that students are missing out on amazing educational opportunities because of the test. A test 50 percent passed and that’s amazing and wonderful and rock star, but not rock star enough and it’s not worth the stress and anguish and constant treading water and trying to keep afloat because she’s going to have to go in and face the music for the 50 percent who didn’t pass even though those 50 percent might be special needs, might be hungry or beaten or homeless or their dad might’ve walked out on their mom last night or their brother got arrested for dealing drugs or they couldn’t sleep because it was cold and there wasn’t money to pay the electric bill and the heat from the candle didn’t quite reach the pallet she shares with her baby brother. AND NONE OF THAT MATTERS. Failure is failure is failure.
And she’s a teacher and failure is not an option and she was given the curriculum and she obviously sucks at this job and everyone knows anyone could teach and what’s so hard about reading some lines in front of a class and handing out some worksheets and hey, you get summers off so stop your whining, and people from the megabajillion corporate world know better than every just-waiting-for-their-public-handout classroom educator out there, so they’re right, you’re wrong and on top of being wrong about a test not actually showing anything, about how states like Texas have spent over a $1 billion on tests with no measurable increase in actual learning because  politicians still believe in Pearson’s Emperor’s New Clothes education policy, on top of being wrong about all that (despite the plethora of documentation showing the teacher is right), NOW the state’s going to give you a grade and make it public or let you know you need a growth plan because 50 percent is not cutting it and yep, you suck, you need to find something else to do because failure is not an option no way, no how.

Yeah. A test doesn’t measure quality education or quality educators.

2. ASK THE TEACHERS how you get rid of bad teachers. Master educators have those answers. Due process should be part of that answer. Growth plans and mentors should be part of that answer. Administrator and master teacher walk-throughs should be part of that answer. The answer changes from school to school, from state to state. But the answer is there, and, trust me, great teachers and administrators WANT the answer more than companies making billions and politicians and “reformers”. It’s not easy, but it is effective. EASY and quality education have never gone hand in hand.

I’m sick to death of hearing great teachers hurt over fear of test scores. I’m sick to death of hearing them say it’s not worth it to teach when they can make more with a lot less stress in the private sector. We’re killing our schools and politicians have turned teachers into public enemy number one. Something has to change. That’s what #evaluatethat is all about. And that’s why I love it.

If you have a story to share, head over to twitter and share. Don’t forget to add #evaluatethat.

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