Commercials

I’m not a doctor or a medical professional at all, so I have no idea about any of this.

So I’m sitting here watching David Letterman, strictly because he does a great job skewering NBC and Jay Leno and even though I’m more than a little upset with Letterman, he just did the coolest thing ever, buying $2000 of Girl Scout cookies from one of the audience members.
So anyway…sitting, watching Letterman, thinking GOOD PR, when this commercial for Abilify comes on.
I seriously thought the ad was a joke since its warnings included everything from heart attacks to deaths. More of the commercial was warning than actual advertisement. This is a depression medication.
I was on depression medication for a while a few yeas ago. I don’t think I would’ve touched it with those side effects!
I wonder how much the drug company responsible for Abilify paid for the ad campaign and how much they make off the medicine, and I can’t help but wonder if drugs like this aren’t part of the reason we’re in need of healthcare reform.

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3 responses to “Commercials

  1. When I think about the high price of drugs it brings to mind how much of the money the drug companies put into funds to protect themselves from lawsuits. True health care reform will address cost controls for drug companies and doctors, not profits made by them. It will limit the amount they can lose in a lawsuit so that their malpractice insurance premiums can drop. That alone would reduce the cost of health care significantly, I believe.

    • That reminds me…
      My best friend’s sister had back surgery at one of the top back clinics in the nation. Her appointment was for morning, but they kept pushing her back until finally, it was just before 5 p.m. She asked the doctor if he needed to wait, but he said no. Remember–Top doctor in the nation. The clinic was back to back to back surgeries. They were making a killing that day!
      Almost literally since my friend woke up screaming in pain. He’d punctured her sciatic nerve. Over night she went from successful executive secretary to invalid. Every waking moment brought pain. Even the opiates she used barely made it manageable.
      Unfortunately, Texas had passed a lovely torte reform bill the day after she was operated on. For three years lawyers refused her case. They told her she couldn’t get enough money to make it worth the expense of a trial. Before the surgery she made way more money than I will ever hope of making as a teacher. She decorated houses in her free time. She was an active part of society. Every moment sheer agony. And torte reform said she wasn’t entitled to the loss of life-time wages or pain and suffering damages. She did finally find a lawyer and the clinic was horrible. Eventually she won an undisclosed settlement, but it took forever.
      Another friend lived the American dream life. Her husband served the city as a firefighter. She was a stay at home mom. Her three kids were awesome. Her husband had allergy problems that caused sleep apnea, so he scheduled a routine adnoid surgery. It was supposed to be outpatient. Instead the doctor punctured his brain. Three times. When he went to the hospital, they didn’t catch the problem until a couple days later when he stroked out from bleeding on the brain. They had to careflight him to Dallas. Today he has the mental capacity of a fourth grader. The doctor, again one of the top in the nation, messed up. But he couldn’t say so or his insurance would drop him. It took years for her to reach an undisclosed settlement with the hospital and doctor.
      I agree that our litigious society causes problems, but doctors and hospitals that hurt their patients should pay and pay big.

    • That reminds me…
      My best friend’s sister had back surgery at one of the top back clinics in the nation. Her appointment was for morning, but they kept pushing her back until finally, it was just before 5 p.m. She asked the doctor if he needed to wait, but he said no. Remember–Top doctor in the nation. The clinic was back to back to back surgeries. They were making a killing that day!
      Almost literally since my friend woke up screaming in pain. He’d punctured her sciatic nerve. Over night she went from successful executive secretary to invalid. Every waking moment brought pain. Even the opiates she used barely made it manageable.
      Unfortunately, Texas had passed a lovely torte reform bill the day after she was operated on. For three years lawyers refused her case. They told her she couldn’t get enough money to make it worth the expense of a trial. Before the surgery she made way more money than I will ever hope of making as a teacher. She decorated houses in her free time. She was an active part of society. Every moment sheer agony. And torte reform said she wasn’t entitled to the loss of life-time wages or pain and suffering damages. She did finally find a lawyer and the clinic was horrible. Eventually she won an undisclosed settlement, but it took forever.
      Another friend lived the American dream life. Her husband served the city as a firefighter. She was a stay at home mom. Her three kids were awesome. Her husband had allergy problems that caused sleep apnea, so he scheduled a routine adnoid surgery. It was supposed to be outpatient. Instead the doctor punctured his brain. Three times. When he went to the hospital, they didn’t catch the problem until a couple days later when he stroked out from bleeding on the brain. They had to careflight him to Dallas. Today he has the mental capacity of a fourth grader. The doctor, again one of the top in the nation, messed up. But he couldn’t say so or his insurance would drop him. It took years for her to reach an undisclosed settlement with the hospital and doctor.
      I agree that our litigious society causes problems, but doctors and hospitals that hurt their patients should pay and pay big.

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